Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11054/660
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dc.contributor.authorYates, Marken
dc.contributor.authorReddy, M.en
dc.contributor.authorMachumpurath, B.en
dc.contributor.authorPhelps, G.en
dc.contributor.authorHampson, S-A.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-27T05:10:34Zen
dc.date.available2015-04-27T05:10:34Zen
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.govdoc00642en
dc.identifier.issn1444-0903en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11054/660en
dc.description.abstractBackground: Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality in Australia. While there is well-established evidence for the use of VTE prophylaxis in hospital inpatients, adherence to such guidelines is poor. Aim: The aim of the present study is to assess the impact of education and system change on improving rates of VTE prophylaxis in hospital inpatients. Methods: We performed four consecutive audits of inpatient medical records of a regional hospital service over 2 years. The audits aimed to test the impact of serial interventions at increasing the appropriate use of VTE prophylaxis (based on risk assessment). The interventions were (i) staff education and (ii) a process change that mandated a prophylaxis decision by modifying the National Inpatient Medication Chart with ‘VTE avoidance’ preprinted in the first medication box. Results: Our results from the baseline study showed that of the 236 medical inpatients reviewed, 80% were at high risk of VTE. Of this high-risk cohort, 34.9% (confidence interval (CI) 28–42%) had appropriate prophylaxis decisions. Post the education intervention, 43.2% (CI 37–49%) of the high-risk cohort received appropriate VTE prophylaxis, an improvement of 8.3% (CI −1% to 18%) from baseline. With the subsequent introduction of a process change, 82.1% (CI 66–92%) of the high-risk cohort received appropriate prophylaxis, an improvement of 47.2% and 38.8% (CI 24–54%) when compared with baseline and education respectively. Retention rates at 11 months postsystem change were 73% (CI 55–86%). Conclusions: This study therefore concluded that while education has an impact on rates of appropriate VTE prophylaxis, it is system change that has the most marked and sustained effect.en
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Gemma Siemensma (gemmas@bhs.org.au) on 2015-04-27T05:10:03Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Gemma Siemensma (gemmas@bhs.org.au) on 2015-04-27T05:10:34Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2015-04-27T05:10:34Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2014en
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.titleModification of the National Inpatient Medication Chart improves venous thromboembolism prophylaxis rates in high-risk medical patients.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.type.specifiedArticleen
dc.bibliographicCitation.titleInternal Medicine Journalen
dc.bibliographicCitation.volume44en
dc.bibliographicCitation.issue2en
dc.bibliographicCitation.stpage190en
dc.bibliographicCitation.endpage194en
dc.subject.healththesaurusVENOUS THROMBOEMBOLISMen
dc.subject.healththesaurusEVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICEen
dc.subject.healththesaurusPROPHYLAXISen
dc.subject.healththesaurusENOXAPARINen
dc.subject.healththesaurusEDUCATIONen
dc.date.issuedbrowse2014-01-01en
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