Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11054/1930
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dc.contributorBishop, Jaclyn L.en_US
dc.contributorPing, Sophieen_US
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-01T06:44:30Z-
dc.date.available2022-06-01T06:44:30Z-
dc.date.issued2022-
dc.identifier.govdoc01894en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11054/1930-
dc.description.abstractObjective The objective of this study was to determine the impact of a new salaried medical officer position on health service provision and organisational performance. Design Health service staff were invited to complete a survey to ascertain their overall satisfaction with the salaried medical officer position and impact on their workflow. Purposive sampling identified respondents for interviews to further explore the experiences of health service staff. Financial, administrative and quality information was extracted for analysis. Setting Medium size rural health service in Victoria, Australia. Participants All general practitioner, nursing and allied health staff employed by, or who provide services to, the health service. Main outcome measures Satisfaction with the salaried medical officer position, ability to address patient concerns, themes from interviews, organisational performance data. Results Forty surveys (general practitioner, nursing and allied health) were returned and 10 interviews completed. The mean rating for satisfaction with the salaried medical officer position was 8.4 out of 10. Addressing patient care concerns was rated significantly easier by nursing and allied health staff when the salaried medical officer was working. The interviews identified three broad themes: improved efficiency, increased accessibility and eliminated service gaps. Conclusion Health service staff reported that a salaried medical officer position at a rural health service improved work efficiency, increased accessibility to timely medical advice and improved quality of care, particularly patients at risk of sudden deterioration.en_US
dc.description.provenanceSubmitted by Gemma Siemensma (gemmas@bhs.org.au) on 2022-05-09T06:08:51Z No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceApproved for entry into archive by Gemma Siemensma (gemmas@bhs.org.au) on 2022-06-01T06:44:30Z (GMT) No. of bitstreams: 0en
dc.description.provenanceMade available in DSpace on 2022-06-01T06:44:30Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 0 Previous issue date: 2022en
dc.titleEvaluation of a novel salaried medical officer position on service provision and performance at a rural health service: An exploratory mixed-methods study.en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US
dc.type.specifiedArticleen_US
dc.bibliographicCitation.titleAustralian Journal of Rural Healthen_US
dc.bibliographicCitation.volume30en_US
dc.bibliographicCitation.issue1en_US
dc.bibliographicCitation.stpage65en_US
dc.bibliographicCitation.endpage74en_US
dc.subject.healththesaurusGENERAL PRACTITIONERSen_US
dc.subject.healththesaurusHEALTH SERVICE RESEARCHen_US
dc.subject.healththesaurusIMPROVEMENTen_US
dc.subject.healththesaurusMEDICAL SERVICESen_US
dc.subject.healththesaurusSERVICE MODELen_US
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/ajr.12807en_US
Appears in Collections:Research Output

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