Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11054/1897
Title: How appropriately is blood ordered in a rural hospital?
Author: Cheng, D.
Bajraszewski, C.
Verma, K.
Wolff, Alan
Issue Date: 2013
Publication Title: Transfusion and Apheresis Science
Volume: 48
Issue: 1
Start Page: 79
End Page: 82
Abstract: Background: Blood products are a limited resource particularly in a rural setting and their appropriate use is important to maintain patient safety and minimise costs. Objective: To assess the appropriateness of transfusion practices in a rural hospital. DESIGN/DATA SOURCES: A retrospective medical record audit of packed red blood cell (PRBC) use. Setting: A rural hospital 300 km northwest of Melbourne. Participants: All patients in Wimmera Base Hospital who had a PRBC crossmatch request from October 2010 to March 2011 inclusive. Main outcome measures: Proportion of appropriate transfusions and crossmatch to transfusion ratios. Results: A total of 257 patients and 657 PRBC units were cross-matched during the study period. Of these patients, 28.4% had pre-procedure (elective) cross-matches. Of the elective cross-matches, 27.4% were inappropriate, compared with 16.1% of emergency cross-matches. The cross-match to transfusion ratio (C:T) was 1.59 for emergency requests and 5.96 for elective requests. The C:T ratio was high in the surgical and obstetrics and gynaecology departments. 16.3% of all transfusions were single-unit transfusions. Conclusions: Emergency requests were predominantly appropriate but a significant proportion of elective requests were inappropriate, suggesting changes in elective crossmatch request protocols, and increased education regarding ordering blood in a rural setting.
Description: Wimmera Health Care Group
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11054/1897
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.transci.2012.06.016
Internal ID Number: 01810
Health Subject: TRANSFUSION
RURAL
EDUCATION
PACKED RED BLOOD CELL
Type: Journal Article
Article
Appears in Collections:Research Output

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