Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11054/582
Title: Towards clinical applications of anti-endotoxin antibodies; a re-appraisal of the disconnect.
Authors: Hurley, James C.
Issue Date: 2013
Publisher: MDPI AG
Place of publication: Basel, Switzerland
Journal title: Toxins
Volume: 5
Start Page: 2589
End Page: 2620
Abstract: Endotoxin is a potent mediator of a broad range of path-physiological effects in humans and present in all Gram negative (GN) bacteria. It would be expected that anti-endotoxin therapies, antibody based or not, would play an important adjuvant therapeutic role along with antibiotics and other supportive therapies for GN infections. There is an extensive literature relating to pre-clinical and clinical studies of anti-endotoxin antibodies however there is a unknown and unexplained disconnect between generally successful pre-clinical studies versus the failures of the many large clinical trials of antibody based and other anti-endotoxin therapies. This disconnect is not merely an abstract academic question as there are ongoing clinical trials of interventions to reduce levels of endotoxemia levels. The aim of this review is to examine new insights into the complex relationship between endotoxemia and sepsis in an attempt to bridge this disconnect. New factors to consider in this reappriasal include the frequency and types of GN bateremia and the underlying mortality risk in the different study populations. Endoxemia can no longer be considered a single entity for a range of reasons. Old clinical trials warrant a re-appraisal in light of recent advances in the understanding of the structure-fuction relationship of endotoxin. The disconnect not only remains however, it has enlarged.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11054/582
ISSN: 2072-6651
Internal ID Number: 00514
Health Subject: BACTERIAL TOXINS
GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA
ANTI-BACTERIAL AGENTS
ANTI-ENDOTOXIN ANTIBODIES
ENDOTOXINS
ENDOTOXIN
ENDOTOXEMIA
SEPSIS
POLYMYXIN
Type: Journal Article
Article
Appears in Collections:Research Output

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