Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11054/44
Title: Culture-positive tuberculosis at St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, 1962-1989.
Authors: Hurley, James C.
Uren, E. M.
Andrew, J. H.
Burdon, J.
Issue Date: 1993
Publisher: Royal Australasian College of Physicians
Place of publication: Sydney
Publication Title: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Medicine
Internal Medicine
Volume: 23
Issue: 1
Start Page: 7
End Page: 11
Abstract: The disease type and demography of patients with culture confirmed tuberculosis (TB) diagnosed at St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne between the years 1962 to 1989 were reviewed. Four hundred and eighty-two patients with culture-positive TB were identified whose origins were as follows: Australia 194; Northern Europe 38; The Mediterranean 98; Asia 60 and other or unknown 92. Patients whose country of birth was in Asia or the Mediterranean area accounted for 57% of patients in the 1980s; they presented at a younger age, with a higher proportion of extrapulmonary disease and a more equal sex distribution than did Australian born patients. The main types of extrapulmonary disease also differed for the various ethnic groups. The overall proportion of patients with an isolate resistant to at least one of the anti-TB drugs was 10.0% but in the Asian born was 21.7%. This survey, the longest series of bacteriologically confirmed cases of TB reported from a single institution in Australasia, has identified several changes in how TB is presenting for diagnosis.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11054/44
ISSN: 0004-8291
Internal ID Number: 00031
Health Subject: ADOLESCENT
ADULT
AGED
AGED 80 AND OVER
ASIA - ETHNOLOGY
CHILD
CHILD - PRESCHOOL
DRUG RESISTANCE - MICROBIAL
EUROPE - ETHNOLOGY
FEMALE
HUMANS
MALE
MEDITERRANEAN ISLANDS - ETHNOLOGY
MIDDLE AGED
TUBERCULOSIS - EPIDEMIOLOGY
TUBERCULOSIS - ETHNOLOGY
TUBERCULOSIS - MICROBIOLOGY
VICTORIA - EPIDEMIOLOGY
Type: Journal Article
Article
Appears in Collections:Research Output

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