Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11054/1313
Title: Acupuncture for men with hot flushes due to androgen deprivation therapy treatment of prostate cancer – a survey of patients and clinicians.
Author: Reeves, Fairleigh
Corbett, Gay
Al-Israel, James
Dodds, Lachlan
Reeves, Simon
Issue Date: 2018
Conference Name: Ballarat Health Services 2018 Annual Research Symposium: research partnerships for population, people and patients; celebrating our research partnerships with the community in the Grampians region
Conference Date: November 29th
Conference Place: Ballarat
Abstract: Background Acupuncture is an accepted treatment option for ADT-related (androgen deprivation therapy) hot flushes for men with prostate cancer, but its uptake is unknown. This study aims to evaluate current application of acupuncture for this indication as well as barriers to uptake. Objectives/Aims This study aims to evaluate current application of acupuncture for this indication as well as barriers to uptake Method A short survey of men with prostate cancer who have received ADT and healthcare professionals who look after these men was undertaken. Results 20 patients and 75 clinicians (40 doctors and 35 clinical nurse specialists) were surveyed. 65% of these patients had received no intervention for their hot flushes. Clinicians’ most common approach to managing hot flushes was with lifestyle changes.36% clinicians identified medications, and <10% acupuncture amongst their preferred management approach. Only one patient surveyed was aware acupuncture could be used for hot flushes, whereas 23% clinicians were aware that USANZ recommends acupuncture for this indication. 15% patients had used acupuncture (pain), and 35% doctors and 20% of nurses had referred/recommended patients for acupuncture (hot flushes – breast/prostate cancer, or pain). 75% of patients stated they would be likely to try acupuncture if it was available. The most common reason patients cited for not having had acupuncture was that they didn’t know it was an option. Overall 36% of clinicians had concerns regarding referral of men for acupuncture for ADT related hot flushes. Concerns cited included lack of evidence, efficacy and cost. Despite this, 93% of clinicians surveyed would consider referring patients for a pilot study.. Implications/Outcomes for Planned Research Project The cohort surveyed had a low rate of intervention for hot flushes. This survey suggests that there is interest from both patients and clinicians in exploring acupuncture for management of hot flushes and that a lack of awareness rather than high level of concern has contributed to low uptake. Final Thoughts Overall 36% of clinicians had concerns regarding referral of men for acupuncture for ADT related hot flushes. Concerns cited included lack of evidence, efficacy and cost. Despite this, 93% of clinicians surveyed would consider referring patients for a pilot study.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11054/1313
Internal ID Number: 01267
Health Subject: APPLICATION OF ACUPUNCTURE
BARRIERS
USANZ RECOMMENDATIONS
Type: Conference
Presentation
Appears in Collections:Research Output

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