Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11054/1171
Title: How does delerium affect allied health therapy after stroke?
Author: Cutts, Brendan
Issue Date: 2018
Conference Name: Barwon South Western and Grampians Allied Health Conference 2018: Engage, Create, Connect: Allied health working together
Conference Date: May 31
Conference Place: Warrnambool, Australia
Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Delirium is a common complication after stroke and significantly increases the likelihood of in-hospital mortality, in-hospital complications, longer length of stay and discharge to a nursing home. Although improvements have been made in preventing delirium, many patients still become delirious during the critical early rehabilitative phase following stroke. Currently, there is little guidance around the length of time, frequency or time of day for patients with delirium to undertake rehabilitative therapies. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to identify whether patients in delirium after stroke are able to engage in allied health therapy. The session length and time of day will also be examined to generate temporal characteristics of an ideal therapy session. It is hypothesised that stroke patients with delirium will participate in less therapy as a proportion of total patient-attributable time. METHOD: Consecutive stroke patients admitted to Ballarat Health Services acute stroke ward or subacute wards were enrolled in the trial if they were inside the first four-weeks post stroke and for active therapy, between 08/01/2018 and 31/05/2018. Patients were screened for delirium each day using the Confusion Assessment Method. Allied health professionals completed a survey on the patients’ engagement after each therapy session. RESULTS: 14 patients have been enrolled in the trial to date, producing over 100 therapy session surveys. Analysis of preliminary results will be presented. CONCLUSION AND CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: This study is the first step towards developing strategies for the effective delivery of rehabilitation to stroke patients in delirium.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11054/1171
Internal ID Number: 01154
Health Subject: STROKE
DELERIUM
ALLIED HEALTH
ALLIED HEALTH THERAPY
SURVEYS AND QUESTIONNAIRES
BALLARAT HEALTH SERVICES
Type: Conference
Presentation
Appears in Collections:Research Output

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